UNLEASHING POTENTIAL IN STORYCENTRIC COMMUNITIES

Home

The Only Two Motives to Lead

The Only Two Motives to Lead

The Only Two Motives to Lead Patrick Lencioni asserts that there are only two motives that drive people to become a leader.1 I have worked with both.

Read MoreRead more" title="Read more" url="https://freedomtolead.net/two-motives-to-lead/" align="right"]

Some Naked Truth About Leadership Power

Some Naked Truth About Leadership Power

  The appropriate use of power is a reality for every leader. Here are some reflections about power I have experienced in my own leadership.   1. I am a steward of power, because leadership always comes with power. The exercise of power is not the same as the practice of leadership. As author Jim Collins says in Good to Great And the Social Sectors, “If I put a loaded gun to your head, I can get you to do things you might not otherwise do, but I’ve not practiced leadership; I’ve exercised power.” If people follow because they have no choice, then that’s not leading.   2. The power I have can either create or destroy; it is almost never neutral. Leadership power used wisely has enormous potential to promote individual and common good. God’s creative power brought the universe into being. His redemptive power raised Jesus from the

Read MoreRead more" title="Read more" url="https://freedomtolead.net/some-naked-truth-about-leadership-power/" align="right"]

Communication Usually Fails Except By Accident

Communication Usually Fails Except By Accident

Communication usually fails except by accident.   – Osmo Wiio In every leadership role I have ever held, my best efforts to communicate have often been misunderstood. If by chance you’re not familiar with Wiio’s Laws of Communication, my experience is all-too-common. Osmo Wiio (1928-2013) was a Finnish economist, educator, journalist, author, and politician. He is best known for his somewhat facetious “laws” around human communication. Here are four of them:   Law #1: If communication can fail, it will. Consider a case where a freshman supervisor is explaining to her veteran team the steps to get a project done on time and under budget. The supervisor attempts to convert her knowledge about project management, which is something invisible and intangible in her mind, into words, drawings, or gestures. It is this visible and audible data that gets “transferred” to the team members. The supervisor and team members may assume they

Read MoreRead more" title="Read more" url="https://freedomtolead.net/communication-fails/" align="right"]